Rotavirus

Background

  • Leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide
    • 95% of children in US have had rotavirus by age 5
  • Fecal-oral transmission
  • Seasonal: more cases in late winter/early spring
  • Vaccination of infants recommended by CDC[1]

Clinical Features

Differential Diagnosis

Nausea and vomiting

Critical

Emergent

Nonemergent

Evaluation

  • Diagnosis usually clinical
  • Assess hydration status
    • Cap refill, skin turgor, respiratory rate
    • Pediatric signs of dehydration: prolonged cap refill, dry mucous membranes, no tears, abnormal overall appearance
  • Consider stool labs if:

Management

Disposition

  • Most can be discharged
  • Admit
    • Unable to tolerate PO
    • Hemodynamic instability
    • Significant comorbidities

See Also

External Links

References

Authors:

Claire